Good Life Good Death Good Grief: Scottish Compassionate Communities Network

Good Life Good Death Good Grief is launching a new Scottish Compassionate Communities Network on Mon 8 Oct at the Charteris Centre, Edinburgh.

The network is for people and organisations who want to get involved in practical work to build compassion in their own community, with a particular focus on improving people’s experiences of deteriorating health, death, dying and bereavement.

The event will give network members a chance to meet each other, discuss the potential creation of a Scottish Compassionate Communities toolkit, and learn about community development approaches.

This event is only open to people who have signed up to be part of the Compassionate Communities Network. However, it is free to join the network and you can sign up here. Once you’ve signed up, you can book a free place at the event here.

For more information please contact Robert Peacock – Good Life, Good Death, Good Grief, Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care – [email protected]

Development Opportunity: Leadership for Integration

Leadership for Integration is offered in partnership by NHS Education for Scotland, the Scottish Social Services Council and the Royal College of General Practitioners (Scotland), receives its funding from the Scottish Government and has recently been extended with new cohorts commencing September 2018.

Leadership for Integration aims to support health and social care integration in Scotland. It comprises of two development opportunities for primary care and social care professionals including GPs, senior primary care professionals, and middle or senior managers in statutory, third or independent social care organisations who are working in lead roles in health and social care partnerships or localities to shape, develop and deliver integrated care.

It has two parts: one programme aimed at individuals and another focusing on groups:

You as a Collaborative Leader (YaCL) – four month programme for individuals, comprising two workshops and three coaching sessions.

Participants in the first five YaCL cohorts said it developed:

  • Personal leadership styles necessary for integrated working
  • Insights into personal patterns of behavior and blockages
  • Greater sense of personal role and potential influence

 

“It was genuinely one of the most useful experiences professionally. I have never had

supervision which has allowed me to focus on who I am and what I bring to my role and how

I can affect change in such a structured, interesting and challenging way. Each session reinvigorated my motivation to do a good job.” (HSCP manager, YaCL)

 

Collaborative Leadership in Practice (CLiP) – six months group coaching and facilitation to develop positive group dynamics amongst primary health care and social care professionals in localities to develop collaborative leadership practices for effective integrated care.

 

Feedback from over 30 full CLiP sites across 21 HSCP areas point to:

  • Greater willingness to recognise and explore individual and group assumptions
  • Greater honesty, less defensiveness and open acknowledgement of fears or anxieties
  • Greater confidence amongst GPs and other practitioners in talking to patients and referring them to other services, including non-clinical services

“…use of a mental health team member in a practice setting, that hadn’t been able to recruit GP’s, which ultimately led to fewer prescriptions.”

 

“CLIP has helped us all to get the imagination going. We share more and are more open.

We’re not assuming so much about each other. We’re not assuming that the other person

understands our work. And when we do this, the ideas get better. It’s small-scale, but it’s

what we can do.” (East Kilbride, CLIP)

 

Applications

Applications for a further two cohorts of YaCL are now open.  To apply, complete the application here or on the flyer. We anticipate that interest in places will be high and you are encouraged to apply promptly.

Applications for both Cohort 1 & 2 should be submitted by Friday 7th September 2018.

 

To apply for CLiP in your locality please register your interest by contacting Julie Higgins, on email [email protected] by 7th September 2018.

 

Leadership for Integration Flyer

Kaleidoscope of Care

Scottish Care's Workforce Matters team is delighted to confirm they will be hosting an event on 28 September in Glasgow.

Kaleidoscope of Care will centre around recruitment, retention and fair working practices in the adult social care sector. For further details including the programme on the day and how to secure tickets please click on the graphic below:

‘The Experience of the Experienced’ – Scottish Care launches new workforce report

Recently (Thursday 28 June), Scottish Care launched a new report on the independent social care workforce at our Workforce Matters event in Glasgow.

‘The Experience of the Experienced’ explores the employment journeys of experienced and older individuals working in nursing home, care home, care at home and housing support organisations.

It is based on interviews with 9 social care workers, aged 41-71, who have either entered the care sector later in life or have worked in the sector for a long time.

Following the report launch, CEO Dr Donald Macaskill said:

“Our experienced social care staff are our experts.  As we seek to address the challenges of re-designing roles, of recruiting a new generation of carers, of reshaping how we support and care for people we forget the voice of experience at our peril.

“We need to mould our systems of regulation, registration, learning and qualification to enable those entering later into social care to know that their skills and experience is valued and validated.”

Katharine Ross, National Workforce Lead, added:

“We welcome the opportunity to work in partnership with providers, front line staff and partners across the health and social care sector to not only attempt to answer some of the challenging questions that the report raises but to ensure that the experience of the experienced is respected, appreciated and celebrated.”

The report can be accessed here: https://www.scottishcare.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/SC-The-Experience-of-the-Experienced.pdf

You can follow discussions from the event on Twitter using the hashtag #exPEERience

If you would like to discuss the report and its findings in more detail, please contact Katharine Ross, Paul O’Reilly or Becca Gatherum.

Palliative & End of Life Care: NES event

Due to demand, NES (NHS Education Scotland) are running another workshop specifically for front line workers and would welcome applicants from care homes and care at home organisations.

The workshop is to take place on 29 August, 2018.

To register please follow: https://response.questback.com/isa/qbv.dll/ShowQuest?QuestID=5222834&sid=bTt2wYKviY

See full event details below:

Care Home Week 18: Workforce Blog from Katharine Ross

Let your actions be stronger than your excuses

For the past 8 weeks, I’ve managed to do something I thought would be impossible:  I’ve cut sugar out of my diet.  Now, I won’t go into the health and lifestyle reasons behind this bold decision in this blog, but if you catch me tucking into a tub of almonds at a meeting sometime soon I’ll happily discuss metabolism and insulin spikes with you in more detail!

In an office where I had a meeting last week I noticed a poster advertising a local boot camp which was enticing new members with the phrase ‘let your actions be stronger than your excuses’.  If I’m completely honest, I felt a surge of pride.  Who’d have thought I had such willpower!

I should emphasise that it’s not just refined sugars I’ve shunned.  Oh no.   I’m carefully avoiding all food which contain oodles of sugar but which is marketed as ‘low fat’ and ‘healthy’.  Also, a significant number of my meetings as the National Workforce Lead for Scottish Care take place in coffee shops which always have an enticing array of pastries and I must admit to having a terrible soft spot for almond croissants.  Mmmm…almond croissants…..

Anyway, back to the blog.

There is a growing recognition that the health and social care infrastructure in its current format is not delivering human rights based care and support to older citizens living in Scotland.  The system is broken and one of the reasons is chronic staff shortages.  A recent Scottish Care workforce research report entitled ‘The 4 Rs’ confirmed our fears; fewer people are entering the social care sector and more people are leaving.

And they’re not coming back.

The workforce that do stay are at breaking point, desperately trying to provide compassionate and person focused care – but finding themselves crumbling, physically and mentally, under unsustainable pressures.  This was captured in another Scottish Care report entitled ‘Fragile Foundations’.

I believe that the failure to embrace integration and to actively engage the independent sector is at the heart of the present-day problem.  85% of care homes in Scotland are independently owned and there are almost twice the number of people living in care homes in Scotland than there are in hospitals.    A new report about the economic impact of the adult social care sector highlighted the fact that the sector contributes £3.4 billion to the Scottish economy.

However, I’m not seeing much action to embrace the reality – and potential – of working in a collaborative, integrated way.

There always seems to be some excuse….

Don’t get me wrong, at a local level there are several examples of effective integration projects which are taking place.  There are two remarkable projects currently progressing which involve Scottish Care providers and the Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice – exploring anticipatory care plans and how best to maximise the potential of the new palliative and end of life care educational framework.  From a workforce perspective, it’s extremely encouraging that we’re involved in more cross sectoral activities and work closer than ever with the Scottish Government, the SSSC, Health Care Improvement Scotland and the Care Inspectorate on both operational and strategic developments and improvements.  Relationships are being built and meaningful changes are being seen.  This is all very positive because it’s widely acknowledged that transformational change is needed – not a little tinkering around the edges – if we are to maintain and improve health and social care provision.

However, tinkering around the edges is what I continue to see.

Strong decisions and policy implementation are eschewed in favour of “guidance”.  Health continues to dominate our national political discourse to the detriment of the social care sector.  Decisions are being made at a local level which could have significant unintended consequences to our dedicated, skilled yet dwindling workforce and providers.  Only last week the Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership announced a new approach in their attempt to address the significant number of older people waiting for a care package or who are inappropriately staying in hospital when their needs would be better met in their own home or a care home.  This approach is going to rely on relatives providing more preventative interventions and being more pro-active in their relative’s care. I would welcome a discussion with the HSCP to find out more – as I have a concern that an unintended consequence of this proposed approach is that it sends out the message that ‘anybody can do social care’.

Well, they can’t and it’s a very dangerous assumption to think that they can.

Care at home providers are now looking after vulnerable people who often have extremely complex physically and mental health conditions.  The workforce undergo a significant amount of training to enable them to carry out their job safely and competently.

Care home staff are delivering extraordinarily complex care and are actually the largest providers of palliative and end of life care in Scotland.  Sadly, this is still largely unacknowledged.  Our report Trees that bend in the wind shone a light on the needs of the workforce who are, day in day out, providing solace to hundreds of people in their last days and hours of their life.

So: have we come to a point where we can’t accept any more excuses for not embracing integration in a way that will transform the lives of the workforce and the people they support and care for?

 

Katharine Ross, National Lead – Workforce Matters

@kguthrieross

 

#carehomeweek

CAPA Update

The Care Inspectorate has given an update on its Care About Physical Activity (CAPA) improvement programme, please see below.

For more information about this, please contact National Project Lead for Workforce Matters, Katharine Ross

Additionally, the dates for the next round of CAPA learning events have been set as follows:

  • Tuesday 8 May 2018 – North Lanarkshire (Care Homes)
  • Thursday 10 May 2018 – Stirling and Clackmannanshire (Care Homes)
  • Tuesday 15 May 2018 – Inverclyde (Care at Home/Housing Support)
  • Thursday 17 May 2018 – East Renfrewshire + North Lanarkshire (Care at Home/Housing Support)
  • Tuesday 22 May 2018 – East Ayrshire (Care Homes)
  • Thursday 24 May 2018 – Aberdeenshire (Care Homes + Care at Home/Housing Support)
  • Tuesday 29 May 2018 – Glasgow (Care at Home)
  • Thursday 31 May 2018 – Glasgow (Care Homes/Residential/Day Care)
  • Wednesday 6 June 2018 – Perth and Kinross (Care at Home/Housing Support)

Anybody interested in taking part should contact Chelsea Bell – [email protected]

 

CAPA improvement programme update APR 2018

One month to GDPR

An update and reminder notice on General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Current Data Protection Legislation

Currently anyone who uses and stores information about people who use their services, suppliers or their workforce must ensure that the data is held in accordance with the Data Protection Act (DPA), but this is changing to allow for changes in our ‘digital age’, and conformity across the EU.

Changes to Legislation

The GDPR comes into effect from 25 May 2018 and it is likely that it will affect all of our members as it applies to anyone who stores or processes another’s personal information.
It follows the same principles as the DPA, but with additional requirements on storage, consent, privacy and access. It includes the following rights:

  • The right to be informed
  • The right of access
  • The right to rectification
  • The right to erasure
  • The right to restrict processing
  • The right to data portability
  • The right to object
  • The right not to be subject to automated decision-making including profiling.

Key Terms

A ‘Data Processor’ is a person who processes data, and the term may apply to the majority of your staff as it includes someone who will look at, contribute to or store data. They will need to know about GDPR.

The person who is responsible for compliance with GDPR and principles is called the ‘Data Controller’. All organisations who process personal information will need to nominate someone to this role.

What do I need to do?

Here’s a short overview of some steps which should be taken. This is not an exhaustive list:

  • Appoint or nominate a Data Controller
  • Write a policy explaining your Privacy Policy, why you hold information, why you may have it in different formats (e.g. paper and digital), how you will address the rights listed above and what happens in the event of a data breach (escalation and notification). Make sure this is available and visible.
  • Write and act upon your digital strategy to ensure data is stored using encrypted hardware, and software which is GDPR compliant (most big software providers should already). Be careful of USB pens.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) enforce data protection so are the experts on compliance. They have easy-to-read materials available for free, as well as a handy helpline to ensure that you are GDPR ready (number below).

They have produced a 12 step guide to preparing for GDPR:

https://storage.googleapis.com/scvo-cms/media/1624219/preparing-for-the-gdpr-12-steps.pdf

As well as more detailed guidelines which are available here:

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/

Data Breach

Any data breach needs to be reported to the The ICO within 72 hrs, as well as anyone affected. They are the UK’s independent body set up to uphold information rights. Non-reporting can lead to a fine.

Information and support

For further information and support, please contact the ICO directly
https://ico.org.uk
ICO Helpline: 0303 123 1113

CAPA Update

The Care Inspectorate has given an update on its Care About Physical Activity (CAPA) improvement programme, please see below.

For more information about this, please contact National Project Lead for Workforce Matters, Katharine Ross

Additionally, the dates for the next round of CAPA learning events have been set as follows:

  • Thursday 3 May 2018 – Perth and Kinross (Care Homes)
  • Tuesday 8 May 2018 – North Lanarkshire (Care Homes)
  • Thursday 10 May 2018 – Stirling and Clackmannanshire (Care Homes)
  • Tuesday 15 May 2018 – Inverclyde (Care at Home/Housing Support)
  • Thursday 17 May 2018 – East Renfrewshire + North Lanarkshire (Care at Home/Housing Support)
  • Tuesday 22 May 2018 – East Ayrshire (Care Homes)
  • Thursday 24 May 2018 – Aberdeenshire (Care Homes + Care at Home/Housing Support)
  • Tuesday 29 May 2018 – Glasgow (Care at Home)
  • Thursday 31 May 2018 – Glasgow (Care Homes/Residential/Day Care)
  • Wednesday 6 June 2018 – Perth and Kinross (Care at Home/Housing Support)

Anybody interested in taking part should contact Chelsea Bell – [email protected]

 

CAPA improvement prorgramme update MAR 2018