The straw that breaks the back of care

The last two and a half years have been a period which has been without equivalence for the care home and homecare sectors in Scotland. Regular readers of this blog will know that I have throughout sought to comment and reflect on the whole range of issues and challenges facing the social care of older Scots during this time. I found myself in a reflective mood this past week about the highs and perhaps more persistently the lows that people have been through these last few years. I was doing so because despite the challenges of dealing with an unknown deadly virus, the trauma of tragic deaths in care homes, the acute distress caused by visiting restrictions, the abandonment of those requiring support in their own homes, of disproportionate and inequitable processes such as Operation Koper, of misfiring oversight and scrutiny, of fundamental errors in guidance and clinical response, of an exhausted and burnout workforce, of struggles to recruit and retain amazing staff, of the limitation of fiscal support – despite all this care homes and home care organisations have kept going, kept caring, kept delivering care and compassion with the regularity of committed dedication and professionalism – until now.

Without a shadow of a doubt and with no sense of hyperbole I am now more worried about the survival of social care delivery in Scotland than at any time before or during the Covid pandemic.

We are living in the midst of a perfect storm and already in the last month high quality and excellent performing care homes have either closed or intimated their intention to cease delivery. The same is true of homecare organisations both closing their doors to new business and handing back care packages. The reasons are numerous and manifold from the struggle to recruit staff, inexcusable contractual practices, the critical withdrawal of funding for PPE and infection control at a time of rising Covid cases, astonishing increases in the cost of insurance and so much more. There are many reasons for concern.

But the proverbial straw which has led many to intimate to me they will simply not survive until the year’s end is the spiralling cost of energy combined with the wider cost of living crisis. This week’s dire warnings from the Bank of England of rising inflation and the increase in interest rates will add thousands onto the bills of many care organisations and will push even more of them to the edge of the survival precipice.

In the past week the media has been rightly full of stories about the sharp increase in energy costs for domestic consumers. I have warned previously that the increases in energy costs now and in October will lead many of our most vulnerable older people who desperately need a winter of warmth to place themselves in situations of risk to health and wellbeing. The increases have already placed tens of thousands of our fellow citizens into real fuel poverty.

Little attention has been given to the effect of energy price increases on care homes and homecare organisations. Simply put the cost increases have already been astronomical and have to date in the last few weeks led to some care homes closing their doors. A typical increase was shared with me this week. A small rural Scottish care home which plays a crucial role in its local community in the last year paid around £6,000 for its electricity and gas. Next year the cost will be £36,000. That is a sixfold increase for an organisation which has no private clients and whose residents are all funded by the State at a fixed rate. This is totally unfordable and without assistance that care home will close its doors and its residents will have to transfer to the local hospital or to other care homes should they be available. As I write this another email has landed on my desk stating a care home is being faced with a bill next year of £210,000 compared to £40,000 this year. And all this is because some care homes are renewing now when their fixed rate deals are coming to an end – and I shudder to think what October will bring.

I hardly need to say that the eye-watering increases in energy costs faced by care homes will lead many of them to shut and cease to deliver care. This will first and foremost be devastating for the residents of these care homes because we know that the trauma caused by care home closure has a life-shortening effect. Some of our most vulnerable citizens will become effectively lose their home and will have to either move to the local hospital or to another care facility perhaps miles away. The loss of home, of familiarity and shared company will be devastating on these individuals. Staff will lose their jobs and local communities will lose vital care services. At a national level a rise in care home closures which is presently occurring at an increasing rate will become a flood of closures resulting in very real pressure on the NHS with hospitals already overburdened unable to cope which will lead to unsustainable delays in discharge and will have a dramatic negative impact on all those who wish NHS treatment and care. Our hospitals will fill up and we will not be able to cope with the pressure. Simply put if the care service collapses and implodes because of the energy crisis then the NHS will follow soon after such is the dependency on both in the economy of care support.

In response to all this – what is happening politically? Despite people like me ringing the alarm bell for several months on this critical care energy crisis there strikes me as a degree of political head in the sand behaviour as the buck is continually passed. The former Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced a not insignificant intervention several weeks ago which will result in every citizen receiving £400 to support their energy costs. An equivalent intervention is urgently needed for the care sector, both homecare and care homes.

Today therefore I am calling on the UK Government to intervene and issue emergency funding to the care sector across the United Kingdom. I want both candidates for the Conservative Party leadership and the Prime Ministership to intimate what they are going to do to save the care sector in the United Kingdom and prevent the effective collapse especially of smaller, rural and remote care homes.

In Scotland we have a higher proportion of care homes run by smaller organisations, often family run establishments and charities. We are in a highly vulnerable situation and these organisations have no capacity to pay the mind-boggling fuel increases being demanded of them. As most of the care home and homecare provision in Scotland is paid for by the State then to maintain care the State needs to pay more or risk both personal trauma for residents and whole health and care system collapse.

The challenge facing care homes and care organisations is at a level no one can ever remember. I have had people in tears this last week wondering how they are going to survive and how they will tell families, residents and staff that they cannot continue.

There is a need to treat this care energy crisis with the same degree of emergency financial intervention as was received during Covid. The situation the care sector is in in Scotland today is significantly riskier than Covid and will have just as dramatic an impact on life and the health of our vulnerable citizens. We need urgent action from the United Kingdom and Scottish Governments and need it now. Local authorities who are responsible for paying for social care are penniless as we have seen in the media this week in relation to threatened strike action and even the additional £150 million announced by the Scottish Government yesterday will not suffice. Only Northern Ireland has acted – in their case with a £50m energy fund for care homes. The United Kingdom and Scottish Governments need to act now to save care and stop blaming one another and passing the buck.

If we don’t start to care about care then there will be no care sector left to care about or care for. There is not a lot of time left

 

Donald Macaskill

Scottish Care Awards Hints & Tips Webinar – 16 August

The Scottish Care Awards are the perfect opportunity to recognise and celebrate the best of the independent social care sector. We typically hold an Awards Ceremony for finalists and winners twice a year – Care at Home & Housing Support in May and Care Homes in November. Awards entries are open a few months before the Awards Ceremony.

If you don’t know where to start or need help filling out a nomination, don’t worry! We are holding a Scottish Care Awards Hints & Tips Webinar on Tuesday 16 August, 2:00 – 3:00 pm for all members to find out more about how to submit a successful awards entry!

Our Deputy CEO, Karen Hedge, will be going through the application and the judging process. We are also hoping to be joined by some successful awards applicants to talk about their experiences and how winning the Scottish Care Awards has impacted them.

This is your chance to come along to ask questions and get all the hints and tips to being successful in the awards. Don’t miss out and join us for this webinar session!

Entries for the Care Home Awards are currently open until 5:00 pm, Monday 5 September, so if you are considering entering, come along to this webinar to get all the information you need! Find out more about the Care Home Awards here.

Details to join the webinar session will be available in the Members Area.

If you have any questions about the Awards, please get in touch with us at [email protected].

2022 Care Home Awards – Open for entries!

We’re delighted to announce that the 2022 Care Home Awards are now open for entries!

Scottish Care would like to invite you to enter your company, staff and residents for this year’s awards. Please help us recognise the work of fantastic staff and providers whilst also giving positive visibility to this often neglected sector.

There are 13 award categories, including:

  • Ancillary & Support Staff Award
  • Nutrition & Eating Well Award
  • Meaningful Activity Award
  • Training, Learning & Staff Development Award
  • Emerging Talent Award
  • Outstanding Achievement Award
  • Leadership Award
  • Palliative & End of Life Care Practise Award
  • Nurse of the Year Award
  • Care Worker of the Year Award
  • Specialist Service/ Unit of the Year Award
  • Care Home Service of the Year Award
  • Positive Impact Award

Find out more about the awards and submit your nomination here.

Award entries close on Monday 5 September 2022, 5:00 pm.

The award ceremony will be held on the evening of Friday 18 November at the Hilton Hotel in Glasgow. More details to follow.

Summer Bulletin 2022

This year’s Summer bulletin has now been published online and is available to view.

We will not be sending out physical copies of the Bulletin due to Covid-19, this edition is in a digital format instead.

We are in the process of redesigning our quarterly Bulletins. If you have any feedback or ideas of what you’d like to see in the Bulletin, please get in touch at [email protected]

Job Opportunity – Independent Sector Lead: Glasgow

INDEPENDENT SECTOR LEAD – Glasgow

PARTNERS FOR INTEGRATION 

SCOTTISH CARE 

 Health and Social Care Integration  

 £45,829 per annum – 21 hours per week pro rata

Fixed term contract funded for one year – in process of securing a further 2 years funding (3 year post) 

Do you have an interest in improving the quality of care, can you COLLABORATE, INNOVATE AND COMMUNICATE, and would you like to join a successful, committed and highly motivated team? This could be the opportunity you have been waiting for.

We are seeking to engage an Independent Sector Lead to support the Integration of Health and Social Care in Glasgow.  Hosted by Scottish Care and working closely with care providers and partners, the post involves ensuring sector involvement in the delivery of the integrating of health and social care in Scotland’s HSCPs.

The post holder must be highly motivated, be able to use initiative, possess excellent communication and networking skills, demonstrate success and experience working at strategic level with policy makers, providers, regulators, people supported by services and carers. Qualifications and experience at a senior management level would be a significant advantage.

The post holder will be expected to create and support significant collaborations across the independent care sector while contributing to the development of new care pathways which will result in the delivery of improved outcomes for people who access care and support. The post holder will ensure the Independent Sector’s contribution is fundamental to integrated services and transformational change and be able to evidence their impact. The role requires considerable and skilful collaboration with our key partners in the NHS, Local Authority, Carers, third sector organisations and other forums.

Glasgow is a progressive partnership and invests heavily in this post and the Independent Sector.

The post is home based with travel, where necessary, and is hosted by Scottish Care.

To request an application pack, please contact Tracy Doyle at Scottish Care by email [email protected] or to discuss this post please contact Janice Cameron by email [email protected]

Closing date 12pm on Monday 22nd August 2022.  Interviews will be held by video conference – week commencing Monday 5th September 2022 (date(s) to be confirmed). 

Job Opportunity – Independent Sector Lead: Perth & Kinross

INDEPENDENT SECTOR LEAD – Perth & Kinross

PARTNERS FOR INTEGRATION 

 SCOTTISH CARE 

 Health and Social Care Integration  

 £45,829 per annum – 35 hours per week

 Permanent contract subject to funding and annual review 

Do you have an interest in improving the quality of care, can you COLLABORATE, INNOVATE AND COMMUNICATE, and would you like to join a successful, committed and highly motivated team? This could be the opportunity you have been waiting for.

We are seeking to engage an Independent Sector Lead to support the Integration of Health and Social Care in Perth & Kinross.  Hosted by Scottish Care and working closely with care providers and partners, the post involves ensuring sector involvement in the delivery of the integrating of health and social care in Scotland’s HSCPs.

The post holder must be highly motivated, be able to use initiative, possess excellent communication and networking skills, demonstrate success and experience working at strategic level with policy makers, providers, regulators, people supported by services and carers. Qualifications and experience at a senior management level would be a significant advantage.

The post holder will be expected to create and support significant collaborations across the independent care sector while contributing to the development of new care pathways which will result in the delivery of improved outcomes for people who access care and support. The post holder will ensure the Independent Sector’s contribution is fundamental to integrated services and transformational change and be able to evidence their impact. The role requires considerable and skilful collaboration with our key partners in the NHS, Local Authority, Carers, third sector organisations and other forums.

Perth & Kinross is a progressive partnership and invests heavily in this post and the Independent Sector.

The post is home based with travel, where necessary, and is hosted by Scottish Care.

To request an application pack, please contact Tracy Doyle at Scottish Care by email [email protected] or to discuss this post please contact James Carle by email [email protected]

Closing date 12pm on Friday 19th August 2022.  Interviews will be held by video conference – week commencing 29th August 2022 (to be confirmed). 

Re-designing older age: an exhibition visit.

I was in London this past week and had a couple of hours to spare between meetings and on the recommendation of a colleague I found my way to the Design Museum in Kensington. The building itself and its displays are well worth a visit – not least as the air conditioning is fantastic in a city with 30-degree heat even when I was there! But I was there specifically to see an exhibition curated by the Design Age Institute in collaboration with the Design Museum, The Future of Ageing, which explores ‘how design is transforming the way society can support everyone to age with greater agency and joy.’

I have written quite a few times in this blog and elsewhere about how we need as a whole society to reconceive the way in which we design the built environment to better include and accommodate the needs of an ageing population. Specifically, I have suggested that we need to stop building aged care facilities separate and apart from the communities in which people  actually live. I have remarked about how ridiculous it seems to me that so many of our housing developments are inaccessible to the needs of a population which will become the dominant group within the foreseeable future. I cannot remember the last time I was in a modern built housing estate which had an adequate mix of bungalows or at least accessible accommodation.

The Future of Ageing exhibition was interesting, less from the perspective, that it was coming up with starkly original designs or suggestions but more from the fact that it argued about the urgent criticality that the whole design community, from technology and robotics, from townscape to rural environmental planning, from kitchenalia to social media, have all to seriously start accommodating the needs of a population who will soon be its majority customers and consumers. In so doing designers have to involve older people in the design process and have to stop treating older people as a homogenous group as if older age is bereft of difference and diversity.

The exhibition highlighted an often-ignored reality that although by 2040 more than a quarter of the UK’s population will be over the age of 60 what is less well known is the fact that over 70% of that ageing population will not be needing support or assistance in normal and daily tasks and activities. Those of us working in social care have a narrowed perspective for obvious reasons, but it is true today and hopefully even more the case tomorrow that the vast majority of older people will not need care and support until a very late stage in life if ever. Yet as a society we continue to view older age so negatively, as a deficit and as something which limits ability perhaps especially in the world of design. As the exhibition declares it is time to put some joy back into ageing which was put succinctly by one contributor in a short and incisive video when he declared “Don’t let people with no abracadabra stop you from making magic!”

‘The Future of Ageing display celebrates how design can help us reimagine products, services and environments to enhance our experience of living in later life with a selection of prototypes, sketches and research from projects that are being developed by Design Age Institute and its partners.’

One of the prototypes I enjoyed the most was ‘The Centaur’ – a self-balancing, two-wheeled personal electric vehicle for people with difficulties getting around. Its inspiration and designer is Paul Campbell from Centaur Robotics who asserts that “I want to end the social isolation resulting from reduced mobility and I believe good design can do that.” The Centaur is designed for the world as it is – it can fit through normal-sized doorways, under desks and tables, and gives a significant degree of autonomy to the person who uses it.

There were several insights within this exhibition but the one that left a mark on me was the statement that we should stop seeing the world around us as one we need to change in order for people to fit in but that we should enable people as they are to better fit into the world as it changes. The argument of the past that it is the environment that ‘disables’ and so we must change it to enable inclusion, is put aside by the assertion that we must equip those who are ageing to enable them to better use the world, adapt to their environments as they find them, rather than to seek to change the world around us. I personally think the issue is a both/and but I cannot deny the practical insight of someone like Patricia Moore who is an industrial designer, when she asserts, “Stop designing for disability and start designing for usability.”

From ‘Gita’ – a hands-free cargo-carrying robot, the ‘Home Office to Age in Place’ – created to integrate flexible living and working space for later life, and ‘Hearing Birdsong’ – a digital ‘audioscape’ app that uses the sound of birdsong to engage visitors with their hearing health there is a lot to see in this small exhibition but all the designs have one thing in common and that is they perceive age as a positive source of inspiration and enjoyment, rather than something to be ignored and excluded.

But the challenge for us all is to look beyond the stereotype and presumption and to re-design the world around us so that it becomes truly inclusive, as one participant said of age in general: “It’s not the way you look  it’s your outlook that matters.” For after all as the hashtag of the event declared #WeAreAllAgeing

Donald Macaskill

A grief that shrinks : alcohol and drug deaths. A personal reflection

It is eleven years ago today that the ultra-talented Amy Winehouse died from alcohol poisoning at the age of 27. She is best remembered for her famous songs’ ‘Rehab’ and ‘Stronger Than me.’ I first saw Amy on the Jools Holland Show early in her career and could immediately recognise a talent which went beyond mere ordinariness or description.

Amy Winehouse did not have an easy life with periods of drug and alcohol addiction, mental health and relationship challenges. Her album ‘Back to Back’ became the UK’s bestselling album of the 21st century albeit for a short time.

I have been thinking a lot about Amy this week partly because of her music but more directly because of her story and the grief and loss that results in those left behind following such a traumatic and sad death.

In my own personal and professional life, I have witnessed first-hand the raw reality of the way in which alcohol and drugs can change a person and devastate a family. The death of a loved one to addiction empties a person like nothing else and so often that emptiness is filled with questions and guilt, with a sense of ‘if only’ and of regret, and with a continual self-examination as to whether you could or should have done more.

I have always admired the work of Scottish Families Affected by Alcohol and Drugs. https://www.sfad.org.uk . I was therefore very pleased this week to have had the chance to meet a colleague from that organisation. They do a wide range of work including a focus on bereavement support and most of it is undertaken at local level. When someone in your family is affected by alcohol or drugs one of the main things you feel is a sense of isolation and aloneness and the way in which SFAD and others can help connect you to others, to limit the isolation, to support through mutual understanding and connection becomes invaluable.

My primary reason for speaking with SFAD this past week was to form links between their bereavement work and the work of Scotland’s National Bereavement Charter. The Charter, whose organising group, I am honoured to chair, is growing from strength to strength with new resources being developed all the time to help anyone across Scotland be better supported in their grief and loss. The aim of the Charter is to ensure that anyone who requires support and care following a bereavement is able to access that and that Scotland becomes a world leader in a human rights-based approach to grief and bereavement. Those who lose loved ones through drug and alcohol deaths have an especially hard journey of grief and loss and it will be a mark of the Charter’s progress as to whether or not we are able to make their journey any easier.

One critical dimension experienced by so many who experience the death of someone to alcohol and drugs is the societal stigma that often accompanies such a death. Someone once described this to me as ‘furtive grieving’, her felt sense of having to hide the cause and reason for the death of her son to a heroin overdose because she felt that others would dismiss both him but also her pain, grief and loss as somehow ‘self-inflicted.’  She told me it took a long time for her to stop saying her young son died of a heart attack and to be open about the reasons for his death and that that openness helped her in her grieving.

In a heart-felt plea in the media this week, David Strang, the chair of the Scottish Drugs Deaths Taskforce spoke about the newly published “Changing Lives” report which makes 20 recommendations and 139 action points that it says will help turn around Scotland’s record drug death numbers. The shocking and sad statistical truth is that in 2020, 1,339 people died as a result of a drug overdose. The report calls for the creation of a national stigma action plan because of the reality that societal stigma and discrimination results in not just personal and family trauma but in unnecessary death. When deaths do happen, that stigma continues to re-enforce discrimination and makes grieving and bereavement all the harder and more painful.

Grief shrinks you. It makes a person small in their body. It shrivels up hope and dreams. It’s emptiness echoes with a silence no sound could ever soothe. Grieving the loss of a loved one to drugs and alcohol makes many feel like they need to hide their grief and so makes bereavement unnecessarily traumatic. We desperately need to transform cultural and societal attitudes to alcohol and drugs not only so that lives can be saved but also that when loss does happen grief can be freed from the shackles of societal disapproval and discrimination. The tragic legacy of someone like Amy Winehouse should be not only her amazing music but an urgent need to end the stigma around all drugs and alcohol deaths, to encourage society to start a mature debate on all the issues without the stance of moral superiority that often occurs, and importantly by so doing to let loved ones who grieve be able to make that journey in openness without societal stigma.

Donald Macaskill

The generosity of care support: a summer reflection.

Summertime is often the time of year that I manage to do some reading separated from the normal rhythm of work issues. Over the last couple of weeks in amongst the usual whodunnits and attempts to see merit in ‘bestseller’ lists, I have also been re-visiting some thoughts and texts which I had put aside for that elusive ‘quieter time.’ In that vein I have been exploring some writings around the concept of ‘generosity’ especially as it relates to social care.

Generosity is often dismissed as an old-fashioned concept but I’m very much of the opposite view believing that generosity as a concept needs to be more embedded in our individual and societal discourse. In fact, the last week busy as it has been with political intrigue and debate has struck me as one that would have benefited greatly from a bit more generosity of spirit and action. But more significantly having had the privilege of witnessing so many acts of compassion and care over the years at the hands of both paid and unpaid carers I am convinced that generosity is wired into humanity but also that it needs to be cultivated, nurtured, and promoted.

The dictionary defines ‘generosity’ as ‘the quality of being kind and a willingness to share.’ Many psychologists have argued that by inherent and instinctive nature people are generous, that they act in ways which seek to better another and to benefit those around them. They have stated that the innate predisposition of children at an early age is not to be selfish and narcissistic but to help others. What is more there is an abundance of research evidence which shows that being generous to others is of psychological and emotional benefit to ourselves:

“A growing body of research has revealed numerous psychological and physiological benefits of giving, challenging common conceptions about the relationship between money and happiness. In 2008, for example, Norton and his colleagues conducted a study where they gave $5 or $20 to people and then instructed them to spend it either on themselves or someone else.

Later that evening, the researchers checked in with the participants to see how they felt emotionally. The group that gave money to others reported feeling happier over the course of the day. What’s more, the results showed no emotional difference between people who received $5 and those who got $20. “  (from How generosity changes your brain – Big Think )

The act of giving is something which might indeed come easier to some than others but it is clearly at the core of social care and support. Being generous with one’s time and skills, with knowledge and ability are a tremendous expression of mutuality with another, especially perhaps someone to whom one is not linked to in any other way than through work and professional role. But the real dynamic of generosity which is at the heart of care support and indeed all of social care is the generosity of individual humanity. When you support or care for another you give of your self – there is a dynamic exchange which alters you. You are and become a different person when you support and care for another. I am not denying that there is a cost to care and an element sometimes of sacrifice, hurt and pain in the compassion and support given, but in most instances the person caring is changed in a  way that helps to fulfil their humanity.

I personally think this generous essence of care is what makes care support a unique profession and role. Over the years when I have met and talked to people about the jobs which they do in social care they have often used phrases such as “It makes me feel better,” or “I get such a buzz out of giving to others.” This is generosity in action, an act and way of being with others which changes the recipient but equally which changes the care giver.

Our society would benefit a great deal from such a spirit of generosity in all our interactions and exchanges, and it would be changed were we to recognise that we need to do more to value and reward those whose essential roles are to be generous to others.

All this is wonderfully captured in ‘When Giving Is All We Have’ by the contemporary American poet Alberto Ríos.

When Giving Is All We Have.

One river gives

Its journey to the next.

 

We give because someone gave to us.

We give because nobody gave to us.

 

We give because giving has changed us.

We give because giving could have changed us.

 

We have been better for it,

We have been wounded by it—

 

Giving has many faces: It is loud and quiet,

Big, though small, diamond in wood-nails.

 

Its story is old, the plot worn and the pages too,

But we read this book, anyway, over and again:

 

Giving is, first and every time, hand to hand,

Mine to yours, yours to mine.

 

You gave me blue and I gave you yellow.

Together we are simple green. You gave me

 

What you did not have, and I gave you

What I had to give—together, we made

 

Something greater from the difference.

https://poets.org/poem/when-giving-all-we-have

Donald Macaskill

Get involved in Care Home Day 2022

You may be aware that Care Home Day takes place this year on Wednesday 20 July. This is a largely online event which aims to raise the profile of care homes across Scotland.

The theme of Care Home Day is ‘Care Home Voices’ with aim to:

  • Listen to the voices of care home staff, providers, managers, residents and relatives.
  • Showcase the expertise of the care home workforce, and how they should be valued more.
  • Highlight how care homes play a crucial role in the health and social care system and within their communities.

How can I get involved?

Share your content

You can help us commemorate the day by sharing any good news stories, resources, projects, blogs or an example of an innovative practice on social media that highlights:

  • The dedication and professionalism of care home workers.
  • The achievements of residents.
  • The innovation of care homes with different ideas or activities in place or planned for the future.
  • How care homes are valuable and important to society.

Please use the hashtags below when sharing content, we will be on the lookout all day and will reshare from the Scottish Care account.

#carehomeday22
#carehomevoices

If you aren’t on social media, please feel free to share any stories with us at [email protected].

Use our social media template

We’ve created a social media graphic template for you to adapt and share positive stories/quotes/testimonials about the care home sector for Care Home Day. These could be quotes from providers, managers, staff, service users, relatives or partners from the community (e.g. GP’s, nurses, local schools).

Plan an activity

Scottish Care encourages care home providers to consider doing some sort of activity on the day between residents, staff, families and the community. This could be an arts and crafts session, some dancing, a garden party, an afternoon tea session or anything you wish!

If you do decide to take part in any activities, please remember to share the details, photos or videos with us on social media.

Promote the event

We have developed some social media graphics that you can download to share and promote Care Home Day with others. Please use these graphics to share that you support the day and to get others involved! There is also a flyer that you can share with your networks.

Events like Care Home Day are a reminder of how important it is to share positive stories from social care and the care home sector. Help us get the ‘Care Home Voices’ heard by sharing and getting involved on social media on Wednesday 20 July 2022.

#carehomeday22      #carehomevoices